“Oklahoma City” by peggydavis66

The Best Bike Trails: The Oklahoma River Trail

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“Oklahoma City” by peggydavis66

“Oklahoma City” by peggydavis66

This 13-mile Oklahoma River Trail system, as the name implies, runs along the Oklahoma River (which is technically the North Canadian River). It starts east of downtown Oklahoma City on I-35 and goes all the way to either Meridian Ave. along the south part of the river or Portland Ave. on the north. This trail is perfect for a hybrid bike.

The official trail map shows all the parking areas along the length of the course. Each one provides direct access to the trail but some of them are via dirt/gravel roads. Below is a list of the ones that provide paved access:

• North Side

o Portland
o Robinson
o Beyers

• South Side

o East of Shields
o Skate Park at Robinson
o SW 15th (east of Portland)
o SW 15th (east of Meridian)

Of course, all of the parking areas provide street access as well.

If you want to do a loop from Bricktown, head on over to the river’s north side (found just east of Byers close to the rowing club boathouse) and start your ride there. Once at Robinson, cross the bridge and make your way to Portland along the south side trail. As soon as you reach the parking lot, exit the trail and make your way to 15th Street. Portland is just a quarter of a mile from there. Take the pedestrian walkway to cross over the river and ride for another 50 yards from the end of the bridge. This will bring you to a paved road that leads back to the north side trail. The north side trail will take you back to the rowing club boathouse. This route aims to keep bikers on the Portland bridge’s north-bound side, ultimately keeping them from crossing the busy four-lane Portland road.

On the other hand, if you want to start a loop from the west, then head on over to either the Portland or Meridian parking lot and make your way to the Portland bridge. As soon as you get to the bridge, cross over to the north side, bike the entire length of the trail and make your way to Robinson. Once at Robinson, cross over to the south side. You can head back to your starting point from here.

Now, if you prefer to start your ride from Meridian, then just make you way to the trails’ east end and then ride back to Meridian. This provides a good 20-mile ride.

Despite the length of the loops, the entire trail system is still very easy because it consists of paved roads throughout.

Experience Fezzari: 23-point Custom Setup

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We are often asked, “How can I know my bike will fit properly when It arrives?  How can I get a good fit on my new bike when I’m not even there?”   This video takes a couple of minutes to show the unique 23-point custom setup we include on each of our bikes.  Whether it’s a road bike or mountain bike Fezzari can custom fit a bike just for you.  We do this by getting a few specific measurements, from each rider, that you can find on our Fit Guide.  Find the Fezzari bike that is perfect for you.

“As a manufacturer we have the unique opportunity to deal directly with the customer.  People ask us how they will know that their bike will fit them when it arrives. How can they get a good fit when they aren’t even there?  We get some detailed measurements from each person that helps us lock in the exact fit.

If it fits better it’s going to ride better, and you’ll ride more because of it.

Your riding preference is going to determine a large part of what we do here at Fezzari in preparation in delivering your bike to you.  If you ride triathlons or if you ride road or all mountain and cross country, we’re going to set up your bike accordingly.

We custom fit and build each bike for each person.

We are looking at your measurements and then setting up the bike making sure the reach is just right and that the saddle positioning is set, the seat height, and crank length are specifically for you.

We ask for your height, weight, inseam, arm, and torso length, shoulder width and age. We use these measurements to get you on the right frame with the right stem, crank, and seat post.  We then make adjustments to saddle and stem positioning depending on how you ride.  We even set the tire pressure and suspension settings to match your weight and riding style.  Your comments also help us to make sure that the bike is set up just right.

Having purchased a bike, I’ve experienced the process myself.  I’ve had a bike fit for me and I can tell you that riding a bike that has been fit specifically for me feels a hundred times better than picking up a stock bike that is a general fit.

We often get asked if we make women’s specific bikes. We go way beyond the generic women’s fit to a person specific fit.  Each person is proportioned differently that’s why we fit the bike specifically to you.

Having grown up on bikes I’ve spent a lot of time riding all sorts of disciplines road, mountain, all mountain, skate park, and urban riding. I think that that love really translates to an attention to detail. Ever bike that we send out of here I know that I would personally ride that bike and I know that it is going to perform for which ever customer gets it.

If I’m going to take the responsibility to look over a bike I want it to be my best work and I want the rider to be happy on it. I want them to ride with a smile, and to know that the bike was custom fit specifically for them.

We really take pride in our work. We test ride every bike that goes out of here.  We often think about the person that is getting the bike, and we hope that they are riding it and it is not just hung up in a garage, but that they really appreciate it for the work of art that I believe it is.

We ship most of our bike and they go all over the world.  We simply remove the front wheel, handle bars, seat, and peddles.  It takes just a couple minutes to put back together and it’s ready to ride.

I’m making a product specifically for somebody instead of just getting it out of the door.  It brings the biking a little more to life.

Would you get a pair of running shoes that are a half size off even though it is a good deal?  Would you buy a suit that doesn’t fit right? Our bikes are custom tailored specifically for each customer.  They are person specific bikes.”

 

“Medicine Bow Rail Trail” by petecurtis

The Best Bike Trials: Medicine Bow Rail Trail

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“Medicine Bow Rail Trail” by petecurtis

“Medicine Bow Rail Trail” by petecurtis

 

This 21-mile trail is fairly new. It originally formed part of the abandoned Laramie, Hans and Pacific Railroad until it was converted into a multi-use rail trail in 2007. The trail now features five sections.

 

Pelton Creek Trailhead to Vienna Trailhead

This first section is six miles long. The Pelton Creek Trailhead is located at the southern end of the trail. It features pay parking, a picnic table and a restroom. The Vienna Trailhead, on the other hand, does not have the same amenities but is the perfect spot for loading and unloading horses.

The path between the two trailheads consists primarily of small gravel, which provides a relatively easy ride, save for the slight incline and a couple of divots.

Vienna Trailhead to Woods Creek Trailhead

The Woods Creek Trailhead features the exact same amenities as Pelton Creek. It is located five miles from the Vienna Trailhead. The path takes you through a section of the Gramm forest that was destroyed by a forest fire in 2003 but is now slowly recovering.

Woods Creek Trailhead to Lincoln Guch Trailhead

This three-mile section crosses Highway 230. The path between the highway and Fox Park is quite rough but still provides an easy ride. The trailhead features a restroom and gravel parking.

Lincoln Guch Trailhead to Lake Owen Trailhead

The five-mile path between these two trailheads feature a relatively more compacted surface, which makes it the most bike-friendly section of the entire trail. The Lake Owen Trailhead features picnic tables, a restroom, potable water supply and two parking areas. It also has a caboose, an information board, a handicap-accessible hiking trail and campgrounds.

Lake Owen to Dry Park Trailheads

The three-mile ride between these two trailheads features a rather soft gravel path, which is expected to become more compact as more and more people use it. The Dry Park Trailhead has no amenities at the moment, except for a free parking area.

Things to do

Aside from the usual hike or bike ride, you can also drop by the Nici Self Museum for a trip down memory lane as it takes you through the rich history of the Centennial Valley.

The renovated 1872 prison at the Laramie-based Wyoming Territorial Prison State Historic Site is also another good place to visit. The site takes you back to the time of the Wild West with its buildings, horse barn theater, 1800s-style baseball games and other special events.

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13 universities with varsity cycling scholarships & teams

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There are only 13 USA Cycling-recognized varsity teams in the United States. Unlike cycling clubs, these teams are headed by licensed USA Cycling coaches and receive more funding from their respective schools. Not all have scholarships, but many do.

Varsity Cycling Requirements

Cycling teams that want to be recognized as varsity programs by USA Cycling must meet at least three of the following criteria:

  • Awards no less than $10,000 in athlete scholarships annually
  • Team shoulders entry fees of most collegiate races
  • Participates in at least two USA Cycling Collegiate National Championships annually
  • Recognized as a varsity program by the school

Brevard College, Brevard, North Carolina

The Brevard College cycling team meets all four of the criteria set by USA Cycling. It is headed by Coach Brian Sheedy. It participates in Division II athletics.

Colorado Mesa University, Grand Junction, Colorado

The Colorado Mesa Mavericks cycling team offers scholarships to its athletes, takes care of race entry fees and has participated in numerous national championships. It is headed by Coach Rick Crawford and participates in Division I athletics.

Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee

Just like Brevard college, Cumberland University’s cycling team also meets all four of USA Cycling’s requirements. It is headed by Coach Tim Hall and competes in Division I athletics.

Fort Lewis College, Fort Lewis, Colorado

The Fort Lewis College cycling team, just like the Colorado Mesa University team, hands out scholarships, shoulders race entry fees and has competed in several national championships. It is headed by Coach Dave Hagen and participates in Division I athletics.

King College, Bristol, Tennessee

King College’s cycling team is officially recognized by the school as a varsity team. It also awards scholarships and pays for race entry fees. It is headed by Coach Dan Kreiss and competes in Division II athletics.

Lees-McRae College, Banner Elk, North Carolina

The Lees-McRae College cycling team meets all four USA Cycling requirements. It is headed by Coach Luke Winger and competes in Division I athletics.

Lindenwood University, Grover, Missouri

Lindenwood University’s cycling team also meets all the requirements to be considered an official varsity cycling team. It is headed by Coach Chris Mileski and participates in Division I athletics.

Lindsey-Wilson College, Columbia, Kentucky

The Lindsey Wilson College cycling team meets all four requirements and is headed by Coach David Grigsby. It competes in Division I athletics.

Marian University, Indianapolis, Indiana

The Marian University cycling team also meets all the USA Cycling requirements. It is headed by Coach Dean Peterson and participates in Division I athletics.

Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, North Carolina

Mars Hill College’s cycling team has participated in numerous national championships. It grants scholarships to its athletes and takes care of race entry fees. It is headed by Coach Hugh Moran and competes in Division II athletics.

Midwestern State University, Wichita Falls, Texas

The Midwestern State University cycling team takes care of race entry fees and has competed in several national championships. It also awards scholarships to its athletes. The program is headed by Coach Charlie Zamastil. The team competes in Division I athletics.

Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin

The Ripon College cycling team is recognized by the school as an official varsity team. It takes care of race entry fees and has competed in several national championships. The program is headed by Coach Ric Damm. The team participates in Division II athletics.

Virginia Intermont College, Bristol, Virginia

Finally, Virgina Intermont College’s cycling team meets the exact same criteria as Ripon College. It is headed by Coach Dwayne Letterman and competes in Division II athletics.
Sources:

https://www.usacycling.org/news/user/story.php?id=6584

http://bicycling.about.com/od/professionalcycling/tp/collegiate_cycling.htm

Orem Police Patrolling on Fezzari Mountain Bikes

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We sell mountain bikes all over the world to many demographics of riders, many who are seasoned racers competing at the highest level and many are just getting into the sport.  While we love all of our customers, some of our favorite people to work with are those protecting us day in and day out, our police forces.  We have outfitted many police units from Chicago to Moab, UT and many in between. Most recently we were able to help the Orem, Utah police force who are right here in our own backyard. The new bike unit puts in many miles to protect and keep our communities safe. Here is a great story about the Orem, UT police force patrolling the popular Provo Canyon River Trail right in out backyard. Who knows, maybe we will see these officers in the new Pacific Blue TV series.

“Delaware River Heritage Trail” by kwesta1a

The Best Bike Trails: Delaware River Heritage Trail (Part 2)

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“Delaware River Heritage Trail” by kwesta1a

“Delaware River Heritage Trail” by kwesta1a

As promised, here are some more awesome places to check out during your ride around the Delaware River Heritage Trail:

 

Flo-Jean’s Restaurant

 

The lower part of the building used to be a toll house for what was then an old suspension bridge across the Delaware River. The bridge was demolished by an ice gorge just a couple of years after it opened in 1872 but was replaced by a couple of others later on. The current bridge has been in operation since 1939.

 

The other parts of the property used to be called Kirk’s Grove, a popular picnic and concert area back in the day. Today, however, the place is most famous for Flo-Jean’s restaurant.

 

Riverside Park

 

This city-owned park features sports, boating and fishing facilities. Once home to the Erie Railroad, parts of the area remain covered with cinders left behind by steam engines. Other sections of the area used to serve as cattle pens, eventually earning the park the nickname “The Stockyards”.

 

Port Jervis Erie Depot

 

If you head left from the Riverside Park entrance, just across the tracks, you’ll find this huge red brick building topped with a gray roof. Built in 1892, the depot was used for passenger service for over eight decades. It eventually shut down due to the decline of railroad operations but was restored through the combined efforts of the Port Jervis Development Corporation, the Depot Preservation Society and the Minisink Valley Historical Society. It housed a museum from 1989 to 2002. It is now being run by two developers.

 

Sim’s Clip

 

You can view this large ledge in the river from the dike in Riverside Park. “Sim” is short for “Simon Westfall”, the owner of the circa 1740 stone house located just southwest of the ledge in Matamoras, Pennsylvania. It is famous for having served as home to representatives of the Royal Commission of 1769 while they were discussing the termination point of the boundary line between New York and New Jersey.

 

Erie Railroad Main Line

 

The railroad bed along a section of the trail in Riverside Park is still being used by both passenger and freight trains today. It managed to survive the decline of railroad operations caused by the advent of diesel engines and the interstate highway system coupled with the increased usage of trucks for shipping.

 

Let us take a break. Come back soon for the third installment of this series.

“Prairie Spirit Rail Trail” by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

The Best Bike Trials: Prairie Spirit Rail Trail

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“Prairie Spirit Rail Trail” by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

“Prairie Spirit Rail Trail” by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

 

This 51-mile multi-use trail provides visitors a calm and scenic escape from the busy city life. Each season creates a unique landscape so you can enjoy a different adventure depending on the time of year.

 

History of the railway

 

A group of businessmen from Lawrence pushed for the construction of a railroad to the Gulf of Mexico in 1858, forming the Leavenworth, Lawrence & Fort Gibson Railroad Company (LL&G RR Co.) in the same year. It was not until 1867, however, that the project was actually started.

 

The section that goes to Ottawa was completed on New Year’s Day the following year. After a short break, construction resumed about a year later, finishing the section that goes to Coffeyville in 1871. A total of 143.83 miles of track has been laid out by this time.

 

By 1875, however, the LL&G RR Co. ended up in receivership and was eventually sold under foreclosure about three years later in 1878. The company was renamed to Leavenworth, Lawrence & Galveston Railroad Company  the same year, only to be renamed again to Kansas City, Lawrence and Southern just a year later.

 

In 1880, the rapidly expanding Santa Fe Railroad took control of the company but let it operate under the Kansas City, Lawrence and Southern Railroad Company. By December of the same year, the company was consolidated under the Southern Kansas Railroad Company name together with the Ottawa & Burlington Railroad and the Kansas City & Olanthe Railroad.

 

Around two years later, the new company was renamed to Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company—a name it would keep until the mid 1970s.

 

The trail today

 

Bikers and hikers alike are treated to a relaxing journey through nature. Towering oak, cottonwood, redbud, sycamore, hickory, cedar and hazelnut trees line several sections of the trail. The steep banks are decorated with dewberries and blackberries. The remaining sections feature thick masses of colorful wildflowers such as May apple, Queen Anne’s lace, Dutchman’s breeches, ox-eye daisies, butterfly milkweed and wild Kansas sunflowers.

 

Of course, there are a lot of animals as well. Cottontail rabbits can be found darting playfully all around the trail. There are also wild turkeys, white-tailed deer, fox squirrels, quail and great horned owls. On top of the trees, various kinds of songbirds provide a soothing soundtrack to make your journey much more tranquil. Finally, you can see ducks playfully splashing around the various lakes and ponds around the area. 

“Delaware River Heritage Trail” by kwesta1a

Delaware River Heritage Trail (Part 1 of 3)

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“Delaware River Heritage Trail” by kwesta1a

“Delaware River Heritage Trail” by kwesta1a

 

The famed six-mile trail was built to take residents, tourists, hikers and bikers on a journey through the city’s river vistas and historic sites.

The ride

The official trailhead can be found at Fort Decker on West Main Street. From there, the trail goes right, taking you to Ferry Street. Once on Ferry Street, it turns left at River Road and takes you all the way to Water Street. From there, it turns left at Pike Street. It turns left once again and right at King Street. Once on King Street, it makes a loop around Riverside Park, passing the ball field and dike along the way.

From the park, the trail will take you back to Pike Street via King Street and then lead you right to the underpass. It then loops back around and turns left at Front Street, taking you all the way to East Main Street. Once you reach East Main Street, the trail will turn right at South Street, leading you to the west entrance of Delaware Drive and the Laurel Grove Cemetery.

From Delaware Drive, the trail then heads on over to Tri-States Rock, the junction where New Jersey, Pennsylvania and New York meet. From here, it exits Laurel Grove Cemetery via Neversink Road, taking you back to East Main Street. From East Main Street, it turns left at Sussex Street and right at Broome Street, where it passes through Orange Square and crosses Pike Street. It then goes to Canal Street, turns right at the first block and left at West Main Street. From here, you can make your way back to the official trailhead at Fort Decker.

Sights

Fort Decker Museum of History

Originally built in 1760, the stone house found on the trail’s official trailhead was burnt down during the Revolutionary War in 1779. It was rebuilt in 1793 and served as a hotel, tavern and private residence since then before it was developed into a museum in 1970.

Railroad Bridge Pier

This stone pier in the middle of the river is the only thing that remains of a late 19th century railroad bridge that was built to connect Matamoras and Milford in Pennsylvania to the Erie Main Line and Port Jervis. The bridge was eventually destroyed by strong river currents.

 Stay tuned for part two where we will talk about all the other great places to see along the trail.

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